New Technology

For Christmas my husband got me a IPad Pro. I tried to use it to create posts. I soon discovered the keyboard was too small for me. For my birthday I got a keyboard to use with the IPad. There were multiple selections. I got a ZAGG Slim Book Pro. The keyboard is not as large as a traditional keyboard but better than the IPad screen keyboard.

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I haven’t figured out how to resize the photos. When I click on the photo, it’s like it’s text and not a photo. I changed the size in the HTML tab, but that’s very cumbersome. That’s the thing with new technology, it takes time to learn and it’s frustrating. I won’t give up though.

Cheers to learning something new,

Wanda

Making Plans

I see all the posts about plans for 2017. I’m feeling pressured to get my act together. I’m pretty good at keeping track of appointments and reminders for things I’m supposed to do, but I don’t have a list of possible blog posts or ideas for what I think I should explore in 2017.

That’s why I like taking classes and why I loved the Savor Each Stitch Book Bee.  They make plans easier when there is a deadline.

I have two quilts to finish from the Book Bee so that’s where I’m going to start. I’m hand quilting the quilt from the Emphasis chapter; it’s about a quarter done. The Texture quilt has been deconstructed. That is more than enough for 2017.

It might be nice to take a break from designing and concentrate on these two projects from 2016.

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How to Play Hopscotch

I’m happy to announce that my quilt, How to Play Hopscotch, will be on exhibit at QuiltCon East 2017 as part of the APQ Nine-Patch Challenge.

I like challenges. It focuses my mind, and it’s fun to see what I can create within the parameters of the challenge.

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I sketched a lot of designs which were very complicated. I even cut a large stack of squares and played around with them on my design wall, but they all seemed contrived.

About that time I was at a party where two little girls were playing hopscotch. The adults had a lengthy discussion on the rules of hopscotch and of course we researched that on Google.  There are many ways to draw a hopscotch board but it’s a simple game — tossing and jumping.

I thought a simple nine-patch would be best and each block could have white lines representing the chalk lines. I also used a variety of fabrics — lightweight denim, shot cotton and regular cotton.

Once the quilt sandwich was assembled, I hand quilted each number in each block. Then, multiplies of each number.

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The finished quilt is 51″ by 51″.

 

HOW TO PLAY HOPSCOTCH

1) DRAW blocks on the ground with the ninth block being HOME.
2) THROW a stone on One.
3) HOP on ONE FOOT where the stone isn’t.
4) Hop through all squares and pick up the stone on your way back.
5) Start again and throw the stone on Two.
6) Hop on the squares where the stone isn’t as above.
7) Hop through all squares and pick up the stone on your way back.
8) If successful, start again and throw the stone on Square Three.
9) The winner is the person who tossed successfully and hopped successfully.

Texture: the last chapter

Texture was the the last chapter in Carolyn Friedlander’s Savor Each Stitch  book and the last chapter of our Book Bee.

Maybe because it was the last chapter and because a myriad of other commitments this summer, I am still working on this chapter quilt.

Carolyn’s project in the book was inspired by Crazy Quilts. I took that inspiration as well.

I have a Bernina 560 and it has dozens of embroidery stitches. I bought some linen and linen/cotton fabric and started stitching those embroidery stitches.

I had a basket of thread from my mother’s stash. She died 20 years ago this year,img_8019 and I liked the idea of using her thread in my Texture quilt.

It was fun to see what was on my Bernina. The stitches were narrow and at first I made straight lines.

 

 

 

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A fellow bee member said it looked like I had created my own fabric. I made some more “fabric” and didn’t travel in straight lines. Then I experimented with meandering with the embroidery stitches until I was tired of it.

I played around with my own Crazy blocks and added them to my embroidery blocks which I had cut into 6.5″ squares.

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That’s where I am. I feel my Crazy blocks aren’t that crazy and I’m unsure if my “fabric” blocks mesh with the improv blocks.

I looked back at Carolyn’s blocks and there is a sophistication to them, and I see that in my fabric blocks, but not in the Crazy blocks. Lots of texture and tension, for sure. I’m going to take a break from them and see where I want this quilt to go. I looking for a better ending to this chapter.

The Savor Each Stitch Book Bee was an enriching experience. By focusing on Lines, Contrast, Scale, Color, Emphasis, Volume and Texture, I learned to trust my instincts, and I saw my design skills improve. I learned so much about myself, and I really enjoyed the experience with amazing quilters who were generous in their comments. I even got to spend some a few days with one of them last year at this time. Susan — you are the best.

I made a collage of my quilts, minus the Color one, to see if there were any trends. I have not finished quilting the Emphasis quilt (far right top).

Use of solids

Improv with structure

Curves with a nod to tradition

Some risk taking

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Top Left: Lines: Date Night; Middle: Contrast: Contrast Material; Right: Emphasis: Mod Drunk; Bottom Left: Scale: Roses and Right: Volume: Solitude!

My new sewing/office space

Advertising works on me. I saw an ad for Havenly.com on Instagram and was intrigued. They’re an online design service. For $199, you get two design concepts, an initial design and a final layout for the room plus a shopping list. You pay them and they handle the rest. You can buy all or nothing.

Using photos I uploaded and my Pinterest page, my designer, Heather H., of Austin, Texas offered two concepts:

Concept

Concept One

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Concept Two

 

I made comments about what I liked and what I didn’t. I told Heather that Concept One was “sew sweet” and Concept Two was “sew cool” and I wanted to be COOL. That resulted in this concept:

Concept

I commented again and this was the final presentation:

Initial Design

I purchased the desk and the cutting table as well as a computer keyboard system from HumanScale.

The curtains were listed at $530 for the two panels and I knew I could make them myself. I contacted my friend Ana who works at U-Fab and is a fellow Central Virginia Modern Quilt Guild member. She found me a great option, $12.99 a yard, and they made the curtains for $89 each, which is a great price, for a total of $300 for the two panels.

I painted the walls a light gray, Reflection, from Sherwin Williams.

I decided to wait to buy the rug since I had a rug I could use for now. After everything arrived I placed the furniture in different locations. The cutting table was bigger than I anticipated but I love the counter height and the extra space. I’m undecided about getting the chair — which I think is heavenly.

Now for the GRAND REVEAL. I don’t know how those magazines and design bloggers get such great wide views. You’ll see it got dark while I tried to get the perfect shot.

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View from the Entrance of the Room

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View of the Sewing Machine Table and Cutting Table.

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Cutting Table — love these street signs I got at a salvage yard. The lamp is handmade from an Etsy shop called Lampada.

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View from my desk.

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Scrap bins find a home under the cutting table.

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More scrap bins on an old ladder we purchased in 1990. The print, Peachy Keen, was bought through Havenly.

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My new desk. I use Big Book of Quilting to raise my laptop. I use two monitors so it looks cluttered. Those design bloggers probably would have styled it by removing them, but this is real life.

The design wall came with me from the apartment, and I’ve blogged about it previously.

That’s it — somewhere between Sew Sweet and Sew Cool.

Wanda