Template Tips

Sometimes you have to use templates. I’m making The Necessary Clutch Wallet, and it has templates.

Some options:

(1) CARD STOCK

This is a good option when you don’t need to fussy cut or when you don’t plan to use the template that often. Put it in the copier and press OK. But, remember to set on “Actual Size.”

(2) CLEAR PLASTIC TEMPLATE

This is a good option for fussy cutting, and it’s durable.

(3) NO MELT MYLAR

This is the best option when you are pressing your fabric around the templates with your iron. I used this method for making applique circles for my Vintage Moments quilt. It avoids needle turn.

Using your templates:

(1) STARCH YOUR FABRIC

If you use regular starch, you’ll get better results.

(2) CUT OFF THE TEMPLATE LINES

If you cut the template line just to left of the line, you will make room for your marking pencil/pen. That sliver of marking can make the difference in getting a perfectly cut piece. I’m not always consistent in doing this, but it is the best practice.

template marking

(3) CUT ON THE LINES

Cut on the lines — not to the left or to the right

template trim

(4) LABEL YOUR TEMPLATES

Some fabric has to be cut on the grain and the markings on the template are a reminder to do that. And, you’ll be able to find it when you want to use it again. I use a permanent marker.

templates2

I’m linking up with Tips and Tutorials Tuesday at Late Night Quilter.

Wanda

Oh, Starch.

BUY IT. WASH IT. PRESS IT.

Each time I bring home fabric, I wash and dry it, then I press it, but not with starch. I use Mary Ellen’s Best Press. I spray on the back, then flip it over and press on the front of the fabric. I use a dry hot iron and I let the iron do the work!

Iron on top

Then I fold and store. That way I know it’s been pressed when I get it out to use it.

Why do this?

It stabilizes the fabric and it doesn’t stretch. You get more accurate results.

OH, STARCH. I STILL NEED YOU.

I use regular starch for applique. Spray a small amount in the lid of the Starch, then use a brush to apply to the applique, then press.

Regular starch starching applique2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

These hexagons, which I’m making for my hexagon applique quilt, were made by pinning the fabric to the paper with silk pins, letting them sit for a few days, then starching them. It’s faster than basting them. I haven’t tried this method with English Paper Piecing, but it might work.

LIQUID STARCH. JUST ADD WATER.

I don’t use liquid starch that often. It is good for making paper mache or attaching fabric to sheetrock walls. It’s great for renters. You just peel the fabric off when you move and wash the wall.  And, if you have any old doilies you might notice they were made sharp with liquid starch.

Staying sharp,

Wanda